Sunday, June 19, 2011

How It Works

You do things.
You try it, this way, that way. You stray, you flop and then you flip again, and something, some things come out of it.

You do them and please, please, you think, do not ask me what I'm doing, what my political take on this, for the moment now I just have a political in-take, the out is not political to my best knowledge. Fortunately, your knowledge is not best. You see, you do things.
And although most of them, you can honestly say, you know little about, the matter speaks for you. (Which, of course, does not mean you do not try to talk with it, for it, explain it, relate it and convey it, extrapolate it, and prove where it, the matter, stands).
Some of the works you work, frankly, are worthy of the highest criticism. They are, yes it has been said before, the flops. Or worse, they have the wrong ideas, wrong media, wrong impressions and plenty-wrong outcomes.

Yet within these plenty-wrong outcomes, things are born. And these things might just make connections, little roots holding on to little pieces of earth. Not that roots hold on to any particular piece, but this metaphor just decided to go its own way, and we at New Art listen to metaphors, so yes, there might be no palpable piece of anything that the roots hold to, yet the work (by now it is work) is starting to appear as if it were actually something, about something, into something, for something. It gains weight.

And then, at some ungiven points, not necessarily at the end or at any sort of finale, the Holy-Flip happens. It could be a form, it could be filled with air or helium, it could be pretty far away from you, but still yours, still stemming from this surprizing head. You might say "things came into place", but you have no clue what you are saying, you don't have the perspective, you just enjoy it, the fact that now it seems clear, there is a connection, things are being said which you knew you wanted to say or wanted someone to say, some other head maybe.
And you know what? When it works, it's so simple.

* * *

All the works above are by Marina Decaro. The first and last image are from a work called "4 ojos" ("4 Eyes"), 2007.


Disclaimer: Marina De Caro was not consulted before writing the above text, and it is not meant to portray the development of her career. The above text is fiction and any resemblance to real art life stories, living or dead, is purely coincidental.
(via)

35 comments:

Magda Vacariu said...

We tend to say more and more about less and less, this is contemporary art. I tend to agree, I am for an art which connects with the viewer on the emotional level.

Suzanne Bean said...

I have enjoyed reading your blog plus looking at the images. I love viewing art from a contemporary stand point, so it is refreshing to find your site that looks at art that is not a landscape or portrait. This is not to say that I don't enjoy viewing certain representational art forms, but not all the time. I do love to see what is going on around the world, which in turn allows me to gain a wider viewpoint on what is art. Even though, the question What is art? is definitely to long of a discussion for a blog post. Thanks for sharing your insights. I look forward to reading more posts.

Mountain Dandy said...

This is so inventive. I'm not sure what the point of view is, but I really appreciate the artist putting it out there for us to try to figure out. It's humorous, a bit unsettling, and touching. Very nice.

umanbn said...

I´ve never been on your site before and I love your approach... you´re spot on with a blog daring you to say or be something or someone you might not normally dare to be. Also, what is Art and who says so, what qualifies someone as and Art critic? What qualifies something as Art? Are we still artists if no one else sees us or our Art...for sure I´ll visit again....

custom logo design said...

great work its very inventive and creation work i always like it. When i was child i always try to do some think like this often successful and some time loser but i don't lose my temperament and craze to do some thing unique and new, its really great work, thanks for this nice sharing.

Anonymous said...

I thoroughly enjoyed this post. It can be hard to give yourself permission to fool around blindly, and to remember that even success feels like a surprise encounter with a stranger (a pleasant one!)

Art Epicurean said...

Great insight and writings. Art does not have to "mean" something. It does not need my approval, understanding or acceptance. I love that this installation is imaginative, stimulating and fun!

traditional sweets said...

Wow i'm fascinated. This is very unique and a bit out of this world. Thanks for sharing.

Kyle Travis said...

I enjoyed the piece and the emotions it evoked in me, very open to interpretation. I myself do not know for sure the emotions the arist is trying to convey or share, and I believe it is unimportant. A successful work is one that somebody looks at and finds themselves drawn to without exactly being able to explain why. I find myself enjoying such art for the sake of the art, not the often nonexistent underlying political takes. Society needs too quit attaching meanings and appreciate a beautiful thing for what it is.

The Healy Press. said...

Wow...
Just wow...

Kerby Rosanes said...

This is one of the most unique art forms I've seen. I can't even figured out what is the kind of emotion the artist needs to convey. Yet, this is an amazing concept!

Nina Winters said...

Your blog is fascinating! I particularly like the first image. I disagree with some of the comments people have left though, as I do think that art has to communicate something, whatever that may be. It doesn't have to communicate to everyone, but art that communicates to no one, well how is that art when art is a message? I am a sculptor, and I strive for every one of my pieces to send a message, to get an emotional response. What that message is depends on the artist. I have a friend, a very famous artist, and his message is the complete antithesis of mine. But we both still have messages. We are both still artists.

Lucas Aardvark said...

Interesting commentary. I'd say visual art must in the end be interesting visually, disregarding why it was made or the story behind it. A reason why pure abstraction can be great. And since our existence is so dependent on what we see, it is very easy to criticize visual art, thus making it one of the most difficult forms of art. Ever.

Belladona said...

I'm not really liking the bizarre headgear... but I appreciate the artist's ability to start a conversation about "what is art."

I saw something like the orange piece in San Francisco at the Exploratorium. It was constantly filling with air and then deflating. Very bizarre and cool, but it wasn't something to be worn, just played with. I liked it.

Green Mountain Realty said...

This is some great art work, thought provoking to say the least, I love your blog, thank you so much.

AnneG said...

I love this entry- you've really captured the essence of creating. Lovely to read. Thought you would like this. Endangered Artists

smallestforest.net said...

I have hung onto every post you've written for this blog since 2009...sometimes I find myself wishing you'd write more, I get so voracious; but when you write it's quality, and so quantity is irrelevant...to pass the time I re-read all your posts, sometimes for the 10th time :) New Art is like a thimbleful of black, black coffee in a blogland of milky drinks...

Cikal said...

I enjoyed reading your site. My first visit to your site. know from my greetings from Indonesia. Success for you. thanks.

MaddHattr said...

Very inspirational. Its great to such innovation through non traditional media.

DELTON BENETTON said...

There is no word to define art ... only the emotion and vision of the infinite life!

Deirdre said...

These type of looks are becoming quite mainstream....I have seen people dressed in similar outfits as part of the half time entertainment at rugby league events in Aus and even the charity shield football match in Wembley. Not as creative as these one's of course but from a similar inspiration I imagine.

Greciart.com - Greek Islands' Artisans said...

Thats very unique and as Mountain Dandy said "the artist putting it out there for us to try to figure out"

Diana Sesarin said...

Nice picture, even I never seen people wear it.

Original Contemporary Fine Art said...

I think a lot of people's viewpoints about what art is has dwindled over the last 30 years. It gets too much into thinking of what it is and what it means instead of looking and getting the communication of what the art is supposed to be. It is like artist's are trained to be weird and then no one understands them anymore and that is supposed to be good art.

Meaning-full said...

Art is more than the discourse around art, or at least it should be. Whether it is figurative art or abstract art. Whether it is "classical" art or modern art. The art itself, like Magda said, should connect with the viewer.

Triangle said...

Comment celà est-ce possible ?

Abonnement vin said...

Nice, very nice photos, i really love this style thanks.

Musik Mosiah said...

Hey! Great post and great blog! If we take time to do the things we enjoy then life will feel much better. This type of art is great!

Los Angeles Artist said...

I dig this blog. There are a lot of "rules" in art, but the more you screw around, you start to figure out what YOUR rules are. Pretty cool man.

john hogan said...

Its interesting how the notion of newism and ideaism, is pushed ever closer to the normal aspects of living, and the other multifaceted disciplines of human endevour, that may have already percieved it.

art & culture said...

very nice Blog and very nice Art i like it so much :D

Ricardo Monteverde said...

What a great blog! The post is
a joy and a lot of fun.
Ricardo Monteverde Galleries
www.rmaffordableart.com

corporate video production said...

I am so intrigued by the pictures in this post. The colors and shapes are just unusual and fascinating. It really makes me wish that south Florida had a better art scene.

Brennan Lowe said...

Great work and strong use of color. Reminds me of an exhibition at the ICA in Boston surrounding the idea of color within in art Check out the website here. http://www.icaboston.org/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/figuring_color/

Nicole said...

Love this original artwork! Thanks for sharing with us.

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